“Detox” treatments: Do they really help cleanse the body? – Health

93

The “detox” diets and treatments have multiple formats but the ultimate goal is the same: the elimination of toxins of the organism. At the base of these treatments is the idea that exposure to pollution and some ingredients that are consumed daily are harmful to health and that, consequently, the body needs a “cleaning“.

Fasting, drinking and/or eating only specific foods, using supplements or doing a colon cleanse are some of the treatments associated with programs of this kind. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the US drug agency, together with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the federal trade commission, came to take several measurements against several companies that marketed products and treatments of this kind.

” data-title=”Detox treatments: Do they really help cleanse the body? – Polygraph”>

It’s because? Many of them contained ingredients illegal or harmful to health or were marketed under the false pretense of curing serious illnesses. The devices used for colon cleansing had not even been authorized for this effect.

In 2014, a systematic review [ndr: investigação científica que reúne estudos relevantes sobre uma dada questão] entitled “Detox diets for toxin elimination and weight management: a critical review of the evidence”. The article’s summary explains that, despite the “detox” industry being increasingly popular, there is very little clinical evidence that support the use of these diets.

The human body accumulates toxins and therefore needs to be detoxified?

“The normal functioning of the human body produces the so-called end products of metabolism [ureia, por exemplo], which under normal conditions are excreted by the kidney, not accumulating in the body. In this way, if the physiological mechanisms are normally functional, they do not require any detoxification intervention”, he explains to the Polygraph. Antonio Vaz Carneiromedical specialist in Internal Medicine and director of the Center for the Study of Evidence-Based Medicine.

Joao Julio Cerqueiraspecialist in General and Family Medicine and creator of the project “scimed“, points in the same direction. “The body has several mechanisms to prevent this from happening as some liver, kidney, lung and intestinal functions”, he highlights.

cancer” data-title=”cancer – Detox treatments: Do they really help to cleanse the body? – Polygraph”> cancer

THE renal insufficiency, for example, it is one of the most well-known diseases in which there is an accumulation of toxins. “The kidney stops working and patients are instructed to undergo dialysis, in order to remove the toxins that accumulate and the kidney is no longer able to excrete”, emphasizes the specialist. But these toxins are identified by doctors, contrary to what happens in this type of treatment.

In other words, the body already has all the necessary mechanisms to carry out its own “detoxification”. When it fails, in the case of renal failure, there are also no “detox” substances that will help to restore the process.

Davide Carvalhoendocrinologist and president of the Portuguese Society of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, explains that the treatments may not even be harmful, since many of these substances are used in daily food, but that claiming that they have detoxification properties is nothing more than “disinformation and quackery”.

All doctors questioned by the Polygraph were unanimous: there is no scientific study that proves the effectiveness of these treatments. “Just ask what toxins these products remove from the body and how they do it. With these two questions, we quickly realize that the treatments have no plausibility and the use of the word ‘detox’ is just a sales gimmick”, warns Cerqueira.

The term detoxification is used when a person has ingested a Toxic product. These treatments are medical and usually consist of the administration of a drug that forces the body to expel the dangerous substance. The National Health Service page has a guide on the topic that you can consult here.

Davide Carvalhoendocrinologist and president of the Portuguese Society of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, explains that the treatments may not even be harmful, since many of these substances are used in daily food, but that claiming that they have detoxification properties is nothing more than “disinformation and quackery”.

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply